jump to navigation

LGBT Scholarships and Academia April 10, 2010

Posted by Geekgirl in Legal and Policies, LGBT, Resources.
Tags: ,
1 comment so far

The Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies

Today’s post is about other great websites. Check out this page. Information about scholarships, academic programs in LGBT research and much more.

Transgender Youth and Resilience April 9, 2010

Posted by Geekgirl in Gender Identity, psychology, Teens, transgender, transsexual.
Tags: , ,
2 comments

For the entire article, click here Transgender Youth

Development, Risk, and Resilience of Transgender Youth

Kimberly A. Stieglitz, PhD, RN, PNP-BC
(Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care,
-, 1-15) Copyright  2010 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care


Transgender youth are a group of people who are interesting, curious, passionate, and self-motivated. Like their peers, transgender youth strive for independence and take risks. However, they experience some unique challenges in figuring out who they are and who they are attracted to in a society that does not understand them.

The stigma they face because of different gender identity expression places them at high risk for becoming victims of discrimination,verbal harassment, and physical violence.The purpose of this article is to explore and describe the literature on the childhood developmentof gender identity and social reactions to nonconforming gender behavior, which in part explain behaviors that place transgender youth at high risk for HIV infection. Related topics include a discussion of common terms used in this article, typical gender identity and sexual development, challenges to development experienced by transgender youth, and HIV risks in transgender youth. The concept of resilience is introduced as a counterbalance for assessment and intervention in practice and future research with transgender youth.

Creating LGBT Acceptance at Work April 4, 2010

Posted by Geekgirl in Employment, Legal and Policies, psychology, social.
Tags: , , ,
add a comment

Even if your workplace has non-discrimination policies and great benefits for same-sex couples, that might not be reflected in the daily behavior of employees or management. If you are straight, this article describes some things that you can do. If you are LGBT, the article also describes some things that you can do.

Everyone deserves to be themselves at work. (Except for the guy who talks really loud four rows down from my cubicle. Indoor voices please.)

For the entire article, click here.

LGBT change in organizations

And now for an excerpt.

Non-LGBT Employees as Change Agents

Heterosexual individuals who are accepting and supportive of gays and lesbians, often called ‘‘allies,’’ can also contribute to a more inclusive work environment. The culture and climate of an organization is determined in part by the social norms of the individuals working there. Thus, creating an environment that is inclusive often requires that the individuals within the organization understand that prejudices and discriminatory behaviors are not socially accepted by the majority of employees.

Although these norms can be established formally by the organization (as outlined in King and Cortina, 2010), they can also be established by individuals. Recent research has shown just how effective individuals can be in influencing their peers to express inclusive beliefs.

For instance, Zitek and Hebl (2007) found that modeling positive attitudes toward gay individuals leads others to similarly model such positive attitudes. Hence, allies within organizations who openly support LGBT policies model norms for others and may be particularly effective when others do not have strong LGBT-related beliefs (see Zitek & Hebl,2007).

A call for psychologists to speak up for laws against employment discrimination. April 4, 2010

Posted by Geekgirl in Employment, Legal and Policies, psychology.
Tags: ,
add a comment

A call for psychologists to speak up for laws against employment discrimination.

Industrial and Organizational Psychology, 3 (2010), 69–78.Copyright © 2010

Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology. 1754-9426/09

FOCAL ARTICLE  Click here to read the entire article LGBT employment

The Social and Economic Imperative of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual,and Transgendered Supportive Organizational Policies

EDEN B. KING AND JOSE´ M. CORTINA

George Mason University

Abstract

The central premise of this article is that organizations have social and economic interests in building policies and practices that support lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) workers. This argument is based on empirical evidence that (a) LGBT workers continue to face discrimination at work from which they are not protected under federal law, and (b) discrimination has negative consequences for individual’s mental and physical health, and on reasoning that (c) organizations share responsibility for the social good of the communities in which they operate. We offer practical suggestions for creating LGBT-supportive organizations and propose that industrial–organizational psychologists have an ethical obligation to support such efforts.

The Importance of Community Climate for LGBT Employees April 4, 2010

Posted by Geekgirl in Employment, Legal and Policies, Where you live.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

When looking for a job, do you also think about the community you will be living in? I bet you do. Your employer should too. That reminds me. Call Nancy Pelosi about ENDA. Now.

Industrial and Organizational Psychology, 3 (2010), 79–81.Copyright © 2010 Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology. 1754-9426/09

COMMENTARIES

Extending Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual,and Transgendered Supportive Organizational Policies: Communities Matter Too

LAURA G. BARRON

University of Wisconsin-Stout

MICHELLE R. HEBL

Rice University

Like King and Cortina (2010), we believe that there is a social and economic imperative for organizations to support their lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered(LGBT) employees. We would extend King and Cortina’s argument, however, and propose that to recruit the best employees, employers ought to be concerned not just with the climate within their organization but also with the climate within their local communities. It is, no doubt, of major importance for employers to foster equal opportunity within the bounds of their organizations.  But employers who write an LGBT antidiscrimination policy into their handbooks and diversity training seminars, offer domestic partner benefits, and even offer LGBT support groups should not consider themselves done.

Correspondence concerning this article should beaddressed to Laura G. Barron.E-mail: barronl@uwstout.edu
Address: Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Stout, 323 McCalmont Hall, Menomonie,WI, 54751

Read the entire article here:  LGBT organizational policies
The Importance of Community Climate for LGBT Employees

Ultimately, even the most devoted employees do not live at work. LGBT individuals who are considering whether or not to accept a job are apt to be influenced not only by the policies of their prospective employers but also by the policies of the surrounding area. LGBT individuals need to consider where they will be living the other approximate 128 hours a week when they are not working. As most people live relatively close to their workplaces, LGBT individuals need to ask themselves questions about these communities. ‘‘Is it safe to be ’out’ in the community?’’ ‘‘Will my neighbors be accepting?’’ ‘‘Will my partner and I be stared at if seen together in public?’’ Particularly in locales where sexual orientation discrimination is legal, the answer may be ‘‘no.’’ Hence, even if an organization has succeeded in creating a thoroughly inclusive and accepting organizational climate, prospective LGBTemployees contemplating a position with that organization may need to think hard if that position is located in one of the many U.S. jurisdictions without sexual orientation antidiscrimination legislation.

Race, Religion, and Opposition to Same-Sex Marriage April 4, 2010

Posted by Geekgirl in social.
Tags: , , ,
add a comment

Race, Religion, and Opposition to Same-Sex Marriage
Darren E. Sherkat, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Kylan Mattias de Vries, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Stacia Creek, Southern Illinois University CarbondaleObjective.

Race, religion and same sex marriage

We examine racial differences in support for same-sex marriage, and test whether the emerging black-white gap is a function of religiosity. We explore how religious factors play a crucial role in racial differences, and how secular factors have varying effects on attitudes for whites and African Americans.

Methods.

Using data from the General Social Surveys, we estimate ordinal logistic regression models and stacked structural equation models. Results. We show that the racial divide is a function of African Americans’ ties to sectarian Protestant religious denominations and high rates of church attendance. We also show racial differences in the influenceof education and political values on opposition to same sex marriage.

Conclusions.

Religious factors are a source of racial differences in support for same-sex marriage,and secular influences play less of a role in structuring African Americans’ beliefs about same-sex marriage.

The success of California’s Proposition 8 in 2008 was a stunning blow to progress on marital equality for same-sex couples. In the wake of this renunciation of marriage rights established by a decision of the California Supreme Court, activists, pundits, and scholars have pondered various factors that may have contributed to the success of Proposition 8. Perhaps the most controversial explanation has been that African-American opposition to same-sex marriage combined with high voter turnout in the presidential election supporting Barack Obama sealed the passage of Proposition 8.

SOCIAL SCIENCE QUARTERLY, Volume 91, Number 1, March 2010
by the Southwestern Social Science Association

“Killing the Messenger”: Religious Black Gay Men’s Neutralization of Anti-Gay Religious Messages April 4, 2010

Posted by Geekgirl in psychology, social.
Tags: ,
add a comment

“Killing the Messenger”: Religious Black Gay Men’s Neutralization of Anti-Gay Religious Messages

RICHARD N. PITT

Sociology Department Vanderbilt University

I use cognitive dissonance theory as a framework to examine coping strategies used by men endeavoring to maintain a coherent sense of themselves as gay Christians. Using interviews with black gay Christian men, I uncover a strategy used to maintain that identity in the face of stigmatizing religious rhetoric. While these men have managedto reconcile their religious and sexual identities, sermons delivered by church leaders disrupt that reconciliation, causing them to have to neutralize these anxiety-inducing attitudes.

This study shows that they focus accusations of illegitimacy on the speaker rather than the doctrine by denigrating the speakers’ knowledge, morality, focus,and motivations. In this way, they neutralize the sting of churches’ negative messages by neutralizing the moral authority of the churches’ messengers. These findings offer new insight into how parishioners persist in religious communities in which their sexual behaviors or identities are condemned.

INTRODUCTION

I stopped wrestling with [being gay and Christian] some years ago once I realized that I’m no different than anyone else except for who I have sex with. God loves me the same as He does everyone else, you know? If itwere to cross my mind, it usually happened when I heard a minister condemning those who are living this lifestyle and I’d wonder how they can preach love and forgiveness and have no compassion for those who are different.

Click here to read the entire article Black and Anti-gay Messages

Gay Men and Workplace Friendships April 4, 2010

Posted by Geekgirl in social.
Tags:
add a comment

Does this fit your experience at work? What do you think?

Nick Rumens

Abstract

Research shows that friendships are among the most important sources of support for gay men. Despite insights into how friends can be significant providers ofemotional, practical and affirmational support, particularly when gay men ‘comeout’ or experience discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, scholars have rarely considered the role of work friends in supporting gay men in the workplace.

This is remarkable given that work organisations remain challenging arenas for sexual minority employees to fashion a meaningful sense of self. Drawing on in-depth interview data with twenty-eight gay men employed in the UK, this article argues that gay men can rely on work friends for different forms of support in helping them to negotiate and sustain a viable sense of self. The findings show how the gender and sexuality of organisation influences which men and women are available as work friends, and the types of support they might give. Also, the affirmational support received from work friends is important not only for validating participants’ sexual identities, but also identities of class and parenthood. The study aims to complicate stereotypes of men’s workplace friendships as sources of support used largely for advancing careers and personal gain


For the entire article, click here. Gay men and workplace friendships

Stock price reactions to GLBT nondiscrimination policies April 4, 2010

Posted by Geekgirl in Legal and Policies, Resources.
Tags: ,
add a comment

So ENDA is not only the ethical thing to do, it’s good for the bottom line

From the Human Resource  Science Forum

Stock price reactions to GLBT nondiscrimination policies
Peng Wang *, Joshua L. Schwarz
Miami University, Oxford, Ohio
email: Peng Wang (schwarjl@muohio.edu)

*Correspondence to Peng Wang, Department of Management, Farmer School of Business, Miami University, 2013 Farmer Hall, Oxford, Ohio 45056, Phone: 513-529-1653, Fax: 513-529-2342

This study examines workplace issues of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) employees. Specifically, we analyze the effect of firm GLBT nondiscrimination policies on that firm’s stock market value. Corporate equality index (CEI) is used as a proxy for how firms manage GLBT issues. Results reveal that changes in firms’ standardized CEI scores are positively associated with changes in firms’ standardized stock price trend during the following year. Our findings suggest that the stock prices of firms with more progressive GLBT nondiscrimination policies relative to competing firms in the same industry outperform otherwise equivalent firms with lower CEI scores. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ABSTRACT

Studying Complex Families in Context April 4, 2010

Posted by Geekgirl in LGBT Families, social, Uncategorized.
Tags: ,
add a comment

From ABBIE E. GOLDBERG Clark University

‘‘How Does the Gender of Parents Matter?’’ is an intriguing follow-up to Stacey and Biblarz’s meta-analysis of the research on lesbian and gay parenting, in which they asked the question ‘‘(How) does the sexual orientation of parents matter?’’ The authors concisely and thoughtfully summarize much of the research on lesbian and gay parenting and single parenting and raise some interesting questions about how, specifically, the gender of parents matters.

Their review stimulated me to consider several key, interrelated issues.

First, it prompted me to reflect upon the ways that we have chosen to think about and study gender. Specifically, Iwould like us to consider a lens that seeks to probe the intersections of gender with other relevant social categories and contexts, as opposed to a framework that aims to identifyhow gender operates ‘‘independent’’ of these.

Second, this review compelled me to consider some of the ways in which our definitions of family have caused us to overlook important elements of diversity within lesbian-parent and gay-parent families.

Third, I was prompted to consider how the data that we rely upon assources of knowledge—that is, quantitative and qualitative—necessarily shapes the conclusions we draw regarding the nature, meaning, and implications of gender and family. In my commentary, I discuss these three issues as they relate to the authors’ review.

For the entire article, here is the link

Studying Complex Families in Context